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Category Archives for "Fishing, Hunting & Trapping"

Phil Robertson Gives Possibly The “Best Hunting Advice of All Time”

Stop reading your Facebook and listen to Phil Robertson give some epic hunting advice!

Here it is folks: hunting tips from the duck master and bearded legend himself, Phil Robertson.

Be sure to turn it up and listen real close. You won’t want to miss a single word.

 

Phil Robertson is always someone worth listening to, he’s been a man of the land for years.

Duck Dynasty is one of the funniest shows on TV and we had to share this video when we saw it!

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How To Choose The Best Rifle For Hunting

How To Choose The Best Rifle For Hunting

Image source: http://www.wideopenspaces.com/top-8-rifles-for-whitetail-deer-hunting/

Tips for choosing the best gun for off grid living

When you are looking into the purchasing of a gun for hunting in a wilderness survival setting, there are several factors which should be considered.

Price should not be the main factor but rather the functionality and the compatibility that you have with the rifle.

Here are a few tips to help you choose the best rifle for hunting.

What is your level of expertise?

Some rifles require a bit more experience in shooting and maintaining.

Where you may want to have the biggest, baddest gun available, it will do you no good if you cannot use it.

Does the gun have a scope? If so do you know how to calibrate it and keep the lens clean?

Regardless of what people may think, guns are not just a mechanism where you load the bullets, point, and pull the trigger.

You need to determine your level of experience with guns first so that you can determine the best gun for you.

What is the caliber of the gun?

The second most important factor in picking a gun for your disaster plan/ wilderness survival is to determine the caliber of the gun. .22 rifles have little to no effect in the wilderness game hunting.

Sure, you can get a squirrel or maybe a rabbit with this gun but that is about it. You might as well have rocks to throw at them.

A .30 is not much better but can take down a deer, though a 7.62 is more apt for that. If you really want to go for the power a .300 will bring down about any animal you come across and is commonly used to hunt bear and other large game. 

Any caliber higher is just overkill as there will not be safari animals roaming the wilderness.

Consider, bullets leave an exit hole and firing a high powered rifle at a small animal will all but obliterate it.

You want to get a powerful rifle that does not leave a large entry of exit point. This way you can hunt both large and small game as the necessity requires.

Does the rifle take a clip or not?

Remember, everything that you need to bring with you must be in your emergency preparedness kit.

This means that if you need to have clips for the rifle, then they will need to be stored somewhere in your bag.

If the rifle takes bullets without a clip, then you will need to have a place where you can store a few boxes of bullets.

It is more realistic to find a rifle that takes a clip which can easily be stored in your survival gear then trying to find a place to store hundreds of individual rounds of ammunition.

If you prefer to have a gun that does have loose bullets, consider storing the boxes in the side pouches of your survival pack or carrying a few boxes in the pockets of your pants (as it is hoped for that you will have jeans which have several pockets and not just blue jeans).

How heavy is the rifle?

Yes, your physical strength will gradually increase as you become more self-sufficient living off the grid.

However, in the first few weeks or months, you are going to be getting used to the wilderness environment.

It does no good to get a rifle that you cannot hold for a long period of time or one that you cannot stabilize to take the shot when needed.

Know the limits of your strength and find a model which is appropriate for you. There are several different models that accommodate the caliber needs you will have.

A good test it to hold the rifle straight out in front of you for 2 minutes or so. If your arm gets weary quickly, then the gun is probably not a good fit for you

. If you find that the rifle can be held steady and that you are comfortable with the design then check the quality of the manufacturing and purchase it.

How loud does the rifle fire?

In normal hunting situations, the noise put off by the rifle is not that big of a concern.

You are hunting and you have found the game that you are going to kill, so what does it matter if it is loud or not.

Yet, in a survivalist situation you do need to consider the noise of the rifle.

Why is this?

The main reason is that you are in a survivalist situation and do not want to give away your location.

Where it is true that you will probably not be able to shroud your location entirely, a gun that is too loud is like a beacon telling others where you are located and that “there is food here”.

How does the rifle handle outdoor storage?

Ideally, guns are stored in a dry place where there is little to no moisture or dirt which can come in contact with them.

Realistically, your campsite may not have these accommodations.

If the rifle that you purchase requires special maintenance or else it jams or parts break, then it is not a very effective gun for your wilderness survival.

You want to pick a hunting rifle which can be kept in moderate conditions and requires minimal maintenance.

Keep in mind that with any rifle you purchase there will be pros and cons.

You may have to sacrifice the weight of the gun for the proper caliber to get the job done, a clip may be sacrificed to loose bullets on a gun that has a higher precision rating.

You may choose to purchase a blot action rifle and a spare bolt mechanism over a self-loading rifle.

There are many considerations that you should take in to mind.

Above all, you need to ensure that you can carry the gun over the course of your survival navigation and that you can use it properly when required.

Giant Grouper Inhales Four-Foot Shark [VIDEO]

Watch this grouper inhale a four-foot shark foot in one bite.

Seriously, have you ever seen something eat a shark? We always see videos of shark attacks and everyone has seen the movie, Jaws.

But this blew my mind.

If you’re an avid fisherman, you know that grouper have to swallow their prey because their mouth edges aren’t loaded with teeth.

This video shows the unbelievable inhaling power of a grouper as it swallows a shark.

Watch the video below to see how this small shark is swallowed in one bite.

Yes, we know the footage is a bit shaky…but wouldn’t you be a little shaky and in shock if you watched this happen?

This rare sight was luckily caught on camera and you can see the grouper make one swift motion to attack the shark while it was still hooked by the fisherman.

The grouper’s mouth and gills create an intense sucking power to bring prey in to eat, even from a distance. Did you know grouper use their mouth to swallow sand in order to form their shelters under big rocks, and then jet it out through their gills?

Something else that is crazy about grouper is that their gill muscles are so powerful that it is nearly impossible to pull them out of their cave if they ever feel attacked. They extend the gills and it locks themselves in.

If you’re out in the ocean fishing, you should always have your camera handy because you never know when a grouper might pop out of no where and steal your catch!

10 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Survival Food Supply

Does the thrill of a new adventure keep you traveling the world — planning your next expedition to far-flung locales?

Do you plan for months for your big adventures only to find something goes wrong while scaling that mountain or hiking that trail?

If you’ve encountered a mishap while out in the wild, you’re certainly not alone.

survival food supply

 

When you traverse remote terrain, it’s almost inevitable that something will go wrong at some point — and that’s why you need to be as prepared as possible to take on the challenge and to improvise when it really counts.

One way you can immediately change your current wilderness obstacles around is to know how to improve your survival food supply.

With a little creative thinking and a little research ahead of your trip, you will be able to live off the land until you can make it out of the proverbial and literal woods.

If we want to learn how to survive in the wild, we need only look back to the very first survivalists — our ancestors made it through life eating the plants of the forest and later fishing and hunting animals.

You can do the same with a little practice.

Follow our guide of “10 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Survival Food Supply,” and you’ll be prepared to take on any food insecurity challenge during your next big adventure.

Let’s start hunting and gathering:

1. Make High-Energy Trail Mix

Because of the strenuous exercise you’ll endure during your expedition, you always need to be eating and hydrating.

One of the easiest ways to supplement your food supply is to make a batch of high-energy trail mix.

Not only is trail mix healthy and boosts your energy levels, it’s fairly cheap. Make a big batch using unsalted nuts of your living, dried fruit and karob chips.

Pack the high-energy trail mix in small bags and pack them in your backpack. Whenever you need a little boost, grab a bag and eat.

2. Pack Energy Bars

Pack energy bars to ensure that you always have access to a healthy snack.

The best feature of energy bars is that they are lightweight and packable.

You can slip them into the nooks and crannies of your backpack so that you always have something to satiate your hunger until you can get to your campsite to start the fire and cook dinner.

3. Study Edible Plants

At some point you may find yourself in a remote forest without an animal in sight. This is where your gathering instincts will need to come in.

You can forage any forest for delicious mushrooms and green plants.

The key is knowing which ones you can safely digest. If you’re going solo on your trip, you especially don’t want to get sick and poisoned by eating a plant that is not edible.

So study the forest plants in the area where you will be traveling.

Consider purchasing a pocket guide that identifies the plants that are safe to eat. When your food supply is getting low, you literally can live off the bounty of the forest.

4. Pack Fishing Line and Hooks

As your travel, you are likely to happen upon a river or body of water with fish. This is where a rudimentary fishing pole can really help you out.

So pack a small fishing kit that includes a few hooks and fishing line.

You can attach the line to a sturdy stick, tie it to a large branch stretching over the water, or use just the fishing line to catch a fish or two for your campsite dinner.

A beginner’s tip: You’ll want to make sure these items are in a hard plastic case instead of a flimsy plastic bag.

You don’t want an injury from hooks poking out of your pack.

5. Prepare a Mini Chef’s Kit

Once you’ve caught your fish for dinner, you’ll need to be able to prepare them for the open-fire skillet.

So make sure you’ve prepared a mini chef’s kit.

This can be very simple — a hunting knife, some aluminum foil or parchment paper, and a meat/fish thermometer.

Of course, not all of these items are essential.

You probably can cook fish without a thermometer. But it’s also nice to be safer than sorry when cooking fish and meat, so bring it along if you can make room.

A mini chef’s kit sounds luxurious, and it will feel that way if you get the opportunity to eat something other than trail mix and forest mushrooms.

6. Pack Water Purification Supplies

Your survival food supply is not complete without an endless amount of clean water.

You need water to stay hydrated so you can continue on with your expedition, and that’s why this is one component of your food supply that you really have to pay attention to and prepare for, as you don’t know what kinds of conditions you ultimately will meet out on the trail.

Food will only go so far.

Without water you can get very sick.

Dehydration sneaks up on you quickly, so prepare ahead of time to be able to transform any freshwater into safe drinking water by investing in some kind of packable water purification solution — such as a wand or purification tablets.

7. Purchase Flavored Water Tablets

Every now and then, it will feel good to drink something other than water.

Packing a few flavored water tablets that you can just add to your bottled water will feel like a treat. In addition, many flavored water tablets also can be good for you.

Look for tablets that include a dose of Vitamin C, for example. You probably can’t drink OJ on the trail, but this solution is a good second option.

8. Invest in a Multi-Vitamin

When you are eating a limited amount of food — and a limited kind of food — your body may not be getting all of the vitamins and nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

Your iron levels, for example, can drop very low if you are eating mostly vegetables and plants, and low iron can lead to all kinds of health problems including depression.

To mitigate this risk, consider investing in a multi-vitamin. It will boost your food supply by giving your body the vitamins you are missing in your daily trail diet.

9. Pack a Lighter

Have a lighter on hand at all times. This is important because you always want access to fire.

When you have the option to cook a meal you’ve collected from the wild, you’ll want to take it. Forest mushrooms can be delicious — but even more so when cooked on an open fire.

click here to get yours

 

If you catch a fish but can’t cook it, you may be in trouble if you eat it raw.

So prepare ahead by packing a lighter. You’ll diversify your food supply in innumerable ways with this simple gadget.

10. Throw in a Bottle of All Spice

After a while, all trail food can taste a little bland.

If you’ve got room, through in a bottle of all spice.

This works well on everything you might gather from the forest — from making a salad of forest plants and flowers to seasoning fish.

It’s a small luxury that will make reaching the campsite each night even sweeter.

What would you include? Let us know in the comments section below:

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