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How To Pick A Good Hunting Knife

What makes a good hunting knife.  There are five basic aspects that are very important, steel that can hold an edge, type of build, handle fit and feel, shape and function of the blade and the carry sheath.

Lets look at each of these.

1) First, you need a good piece of steel.

The blade must hold and edge well and be durable. Quality damascus fits that requirement great. If you are in the market for a damascus knife know that, while it holds a great edge, it requires maintenance.

Damascus represents an art of design and a level of craftsmanship commitment that gets passed on to the owner.

how to pick the perfect hunting knife

The maintenance is not a big deal but if you know you are the type of guy who doesn’t appreciate your tools to that level you should go stainless.

If maintenance free is your goal there are a few stainless options. The most important thing, again, is to be sure you get one that holds an edge and is durable.

There are many stainless options on the market these days and while some are great, some are garbage. Remember, the point of stainless is less maintenance but you want to achieve that without much compromise of its blade function.

For my money, D2 tool steel is the best choice for a knife.

While it is just under being considered true stainless it needs very little care and will hold an edge like to other.

One draw back, some say, is that it is harder to sharpen than a cheaper steel and that is true, you must spend a little more time getting the edge.

But when you are in the field and need a knife to cut and finish the job it is your steel. Being able to sharpen the blade easily is a plus so stay away from multi-faceted edged blades.

 

2) Second, the knife should be a full tang.  Period.

 

3) Third, the handle has to have excellent hold-ability even when it is bloody, wet or covered in fat.

I prefer the timeless unfinished wooden handles.

However, they need to be maintained by oiling them once in a while. If not they will absorb blood etc and and they can dry out and crack over time.

Raw wood is in the same class as damascus so do some honest soul searching before committing to your knife purchase.

If you find you are a maintenance free guy new resin based materials, such as G10, are great. The benefits of G10 is it is impervious to liquids, stable and very durable. The cons is they are fairly unimpressive in looks.

Definitely function over form.

Different layering of G10 can create a unique and desirable look if you can find the product. KRYTON handles have good surface grip but it does absorb moisture.

When cleaning fish of butchering the blood and other fluids will absorb into the handle and eventually that can get nasty. The most important factor is control and that is achieved by a good hand fit to the handle.

An intentional ergonomic design that stays in place should be sought out.

 

4) Fourth, the shape of the blade will determine how it functions.

If you want an all purpose knife you will need a blade that is strong enough to separate joints yet has a tip that is nimble enough to fit in awkward places.

It is also needs to have some belly in the blade towards the tip of the knife for skinning. I would stay away from fad gut hooks, mostly rookies use them and they get in the way when butchering. They are also very hard to sharpen.

The people who like them do so for the look and not the function and I admit I have seen some cool looking gut hook knives but they ate not going with me in the field.

Also, you don’t want a blade that is too long. I find that anywhere between 5-8 inches in blade length works well for whitetail size game.

 

5) Another thing commonly overlooked is a good sheath.

Most modern hunters don’t wear there knives in the field. They throw them in their packs and pull them out when needed.

However, if you wear yours in the field be sure that sheath has a strap or at least be sure it holds the knife firmly in place.  Is sad to lose a $150 knife walking through the woods in the dark because you had a good knife resting in a poorly fitted sheath.

Follow these tips and you should end up with a knife that becomes a beneficial partner in the field for life.

Good luck and safe hunting this season from all of us at Bliss Knife Works.

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10 Best Books About Survival Part 2

You’ve come to the right place if you’re looking for the 10 Best Books About Survival

this is part 2 of the “Best Books About Survival” list we have.

For part 1, visit the link here –> 10 Best Books About Survival

As a continuation we’re going to start at number 5…

5) SAS Survival Guide  

SAS Survival Handbook
This bestselling survival handbook written by ex-Special Air Service survival expert John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman contains some of the most reliable and respected survival info available.

From old-school navigation skills to up-to-date technologies like GPS, you can learn survival skills for any climate, on land or at sea. Disaster survival and other contemporary topics have been added to more recent additions of this popular and trusted book.

4) When All Hell Breaks Loose 

when all hell breaks loose

When All Hell Breaks Loose 
Another great read from Cody Lundin is his 2009 disaster survival guide, When All Hell Breaks Loose.

For those that liked 98.6 Degrees, you’ll love this large book filled with disaster preps and emergency skills. With topics ranging from bugging out, to building an emergency outdoor kitchen, to dealing with a dead body, there is a wealth of information covered in this very detailed book. This is not just a disaster survival or urban survival book; there are lessons in here for almost any type of emergency. This is one of my favorite books.

3) Peterson’s Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants 

Peterson’s Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants
Every survival library needs a copy of this book, and so does every Bug Out Bag. The 400 plants described in this book are found throughout the eastern half of the U.S., with many of them growing coast to coast.

This concise book tells you which wild plants to use for salad, tea, root vegetables, and many other foraged foods. Don’t let the black and white line drawings deter you.

This book has the details and an extensive number of plants that many slick-looking books with color photos are lacking. Never go hungry again with this book in your pocket.

2) Tom Brown’s Field Guide To Wilderness Survival 

Tom Brown’s Field Guide To Wilderness Survival
This back-to-basics book shows you how to take care of shelter, water, fire, food, tools, and supplies, along with instructions on identifying wild edible plants, tanning hides, improving your archery skills and much more.

This book, along with the author’s score of other books, have created an East Coast survival skills phenomenon.

1) The Outward Bound Wilderness First-Aid Handbook  

Outward Bound Wilderness First-Aid Handbook
This handbook by Jeffrey Isaac, PA-C, is a very detailed medical book, full of technical info written in easily understood language.

This book caters to the outdoorsy crowd and covers many scenarios that you would commonly face while in the wilderness. Muscular and skeletal injuries, toxins, cold injuries, dental problems, and many other ailments and injuries are explained and a variety of treatments are offered.

If this book doesn’t keep you in one piece on the way to the doctor, nothing will.

 

For part 1, visit the link here –> 10 Best Books About Survival

This Tent Will Change The Way We Think Of Camping! You Have To See This!

The future of camping is already here. It’s called The Orange Solar Tent and it brings technology and nature together at last.

United States design firm, Kaleidoscope, teamed up with UK telecommunications company, Orange Communications, to bring this idea to life.

The tents were originally designed for use at music festivals such as the Glastonbury Festival in the UK, but they would be perfect for camping anywhere at all.

Watch the video below to see how it works.

 

#1 Future Of Camping

Kaleidoscope and Orange Communication bring us this revolutionary new tent.

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#2 Sleeps 4

These tents can be deceiving, comfortably sleeping 4.

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#3 Festivals

Originally designed for festivals, campers got there hands on it and a new breed of camping was born.

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#4 Solar Cells

The solar cells provide heat naturally for the tent, while providing shade and heat reflection in the day.

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#5 Radiation Illumination

These tents are completely solar powered. Truly amazing.

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While we think that is badass…. it’s a little pricy compared to this Double Layer Waterproof Camping Tent

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The Bushcraft Brain Exposed – 20 Fascinating Facts

The Bushcraft Brain Exposed – 20 Fascinating Facts

Survivalist training and outdoor skills have been quickly growing in popularity in recent years. More people are choosing to learn how to survive in the wilderness with basic skills that were employed for thousands of years by humans.
These skills have earned the moniker “bushcraft.”Bushcraft enthusiasts have trained their brains to think differently when confronted with the untamed elements of the wilderness.

The skills and techniques these experts use are a mix of Old World methodology and modern technology without the help of electronics. Bushcraft goes back to basics and survival in its simplest and most practical forms.Inside the Bushcraft Brain

A bushcraft survivalist does not simply rely on tools and a few tricks to keep themselves alive in an unforeseen emergency.

A bushcraft survivalist learns how to survive in the wilderness, because they can. Tools are a big part of bushcraft, but bushcraft is much more than using a knife or hunting tools.
bushcraft brain exposed
The brains of a bushcraft survivalist are filled with information about their environment, the usefulness of plants, fire-building skills, shelter construction, water filtration, trap making and setting, navigation, and more.
Below are 20 interesting facts housed in the bushcraft brain.1. You Live Off the Land

Bushcraft isn’t an extended camping trip. It involves survival using what you have on hand and the environment surrounding you.

You are not trying to keep yourself going until you are rescued. You are building a livable space for yourself among the wilderness, harnessing nature’s vast resources for your own purposes.

2. You Start With a Good Knife

Any serious bushcraft survivalist won’t skimp on a quality knife.

A knife is a tool of many uses when wielded properly and efficiently. Bushcraft knives are sturdy and sharp, and can be used for everything from slicing materials for a fire to hunting and killing an animal when necessary.

3. Fire Can Be Made Numerous Ways

In bushcraft, matches and lighters are luxury, but not unheard of entirely. Other methods should always be in your arsenal of knowledge, too.

Bushcrafters learn how to make fire from a fire drill, striking rocks to form a spark, and the use of a mirror to reflect sunlight on tinder until it smolders.

4. You Must Respect Nature

Bushcrafters respect their environment and understand that they may not be the apex predator in the wilderness.

Blithely exploring a natural environment can get you hurt or killed. Be mindful of your surroundings including, animals, plants, insects, natural formations, water sources, and weather. Underestimating the wild is not just dangerous it’s stupid.

5. Your Clothing is Your Shelter

Building a shelter may be on the top of the list for an inexperienced survivalist, but you should consider shelter when you dress before heading out into the wilderness.

Your choice of clothing should keep you warm if necessary, protect your skin from sun, poisonous leaves, and poor weather conditions.

Clothing isn’t meant to be anything more than a temporary measure for shelter, but it should be fully utilized.

6. Hunting and Trapping Provides More Than a Meal

Part of bushcraft focuses on hunting and building trap devices to catch game and fish.

Without protein, the body has a more difficult time keeping up the energy needed to continue surviving in a harsh environment.

You should also learn skills on how to gut and break down different animals for food preparation and reusing certain parts of the animal like tendons and bones.

7. You Need To Be a Hunter-Gatherer

Hunting is useful, but is not guaranteed to result in a substantial meal every time out.

Foraging is an excellent way to sustain your diet when meat is unavailable. Edible plants and berries can be good sources of much needed vitamins that meat cannot provide.

8. Tracking Provides You With Information

Tracking animals is essential when hunting, but bushcrafters will tell you that you learn more than where an animal is located.

Animals can lead you to a viable water source or a food source you can forage. Keep in mind, animals need to eat and drink as well, and they are probably more familiar with their surroundings than you are.

9. Knot tying is a Versatile and Necessary Skill

Learning to tie a variety of knots can make or break your survival experience.

Knots are used to build shelters, fashioning tools or weapons, constructing rafts and traps, or creating equipment like baskets or sleds.

10. Water is Your Lifeblood

The need for a viable water cannot be overstated. Bushcrafters must know how to find, purify, filter, and store water.

Different methods can be employed to make water safe to drink, but boiling is among the most popular.

Traveling with a pot to boil and store water in is a good idea, but you should also have another vessel to collect rainwater, which doesn’t need to be filtered before drinking.

11. Waste Can Do You Harm

If you are fortunate enough to hunt down an animal, but there is too much meat to eat in one sitting, it is important that the meat does not go to waste.

Learn how to preserve the meat safely by drying or smoking the leftovers into jerky for later meals.

By allowing meat to rot, you could be throwing the only source of food you have away until more is obtained and that is easier said than done in the wilderness.

12. Food Attracts Other Predators

Bushcrafters are mindful that they are surrounded by living things. Butchered animals, cooking meat, or rotting flesh can attract other hungry animals to your camp.

Always keep food properly stored and discard unusable material far away, from where you’ve set up your camp.

13. Knowledge Can Keep You in Good Health

First aid skills are important because you are likely to be injured in some way while out in the wilderness. Without immediate access to help, you have only yourself to rely upon.

Natural remedies found in the environment can provide treatments for pain, fever, stomach upset, and other ailments, so do your homework!

14. Bleach Can Purify Water

A couple drops of bleach per pint of water can purify the water and make it safe to drink. The dirtier the water, the more drops you can add.

15. Dehydration Can Hit You Unexpectedly

You can become dehydrated without even realizing anything is wrong. Many body functions use water, using up what is already inside your body.

Drink water often and rest frequently, especially in hot weather.

16. Bushcrafting Requires Research

Learning about the environment you will bushcraft in is vital to your success in the wilderness.

Understanding a certain area allows you to get to know the layout of the area, the animals and plants, and which tools will be the most useful to you.

17. Packing Light Keeps You Nimble

Bringing tools you don’t need or are wrong for an environment is a waste of space and can weigh you down. You will move much faster if you are not encumbered by useless items.

18. Pine Needles Make a Great Tea

Fresh, green pine needles can be steeped in boiling water to drink for a Vitamin C boost. This is especially helpful if you are feeling under the weather.

19. Bushcrafting With a Partner Can Keep You Sane

A bushcraft experience can become lonely after awhile. Bringing a partner gives you someone to commiserate with and share the workload.

20. Documenting Your Experience is Part of the Learning

Keep an accurate account of your experiences as they happen in a journal.

Bushcraft is a collection of skills that take time to hone and mistakes will inevitably be made.

You will learn faster if you teach yourself how and what to improve upon.

Steven Tyler’s New Country Song With Off The Grid, Gypsy, Hippie Music Video Goes Viral

In this great new music video, Steven Tyler is no stranger to the trends sweeping our planet.  It is a return to Hippie with an Off The Grid twist.  It is loving nature, home and family grown.

steventyleroffgrid

With the addition of the Gypsy wagon, a drum circle in the field, and the shot of him standing in front of the giant tree, Steven portrays a human love and care for nature while singing country about love.

gypsie

 

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