How to make self-rising flour

How to make self-rising flour

Diversify your all-purpose flour to make it truly all purpose

If you are a prepper then the odds are you have a supply of grain somewhere in your food storage. You may have all-purpose flour stored up and even some self-rising flour. Still, you need to know how to create your own various flours and backing ingredients from scratch. Produce and baking ingredients may not be available in a survivalist situation. Where many overlook ingredient preparation skills, it is a vital part in being able to make and cook your own food. As bread is one of the cheapest foods to make (and yes I now there is little nutritional value in it), understanding how to make self-rising flour is important. Here is a step by step guide on how to make your own self-rising flour.

Step One: Get some grain seed


flour2 Wheat

If you do not have wheat or nuts, you can generally find a supply at an orchard or a farmer’s market. As grain grows in an abundance (as of now) the seeds are relatively cheap. Wheat seeds have a light brown texture or a somewhat white appearance. You do not want to get dark or roasted seeds. If you do not want to use wheat you can substitute barley, oats, nuts, rye, corn, and such to make your flour. Keep in mind that for the best results wheat should be used as you are going to prepare the ingredients for a chemical reaction. ENSURE YOUR SEEDS ARE DRY. If you need to use a dehydrator to ensure that all the moisture is out of the seeds. It is better that you have a dry seed then to have anything wet. If using nuts, you will want to shell the nut. Keep in mind that certain nuts have a low shelf life and do not make good flour (such as walnuts) where other nuts are great for flour (such as almonds). Do a bit of research to see which choice is best for you.

Step Two: Grind it to a powder

The next step is to grind the seeds to a powder. You want to ensure that there are no big chunks of seed within the mixture. Personally, I use a food processor and put the setting to pulp. The flour should be nice and fluffy. If it looks like blue cheese or has a sandy feel to it you need to grind it more.  As there is no liquid in the seed you should not have a paste.  If your seeds do form a paste then you will need to remove the moisture from your remaining seeds and start over. Of course, you can always cheat and go to a health food store and they will usually grind it for you.

Step Three: Add Backing Powder

Backing powder is going to be the main substance that causes the flour to rise. However, you do not want to overdo it. The ratio is 1 and ½ teaspoon for every cup of flour that you have made.  One pound of unground wheat will make about 4 cups of flour when ground. This would be the easiest way to add the baking soda as it would be a full 6 teaspoons.

Mix the contents in thoroughly.  It is recommended that you put the flour and the baking powder into the food processor and hit the pulse button a few times. If you are making the flour in a wilderness situation then you will want to mix the flour until there are no visible signs of the powder in the flour.

Step Four: Add Salt

salt

¼ of a teaspoon of salt is added to every cup. Again, it is better that you add salt on a pound (4 cups) as it makes the math a bit easier. You do not want to use salt that has thick grains such as rock salt, sea salt, kosher salt, or Epson (as that should never be used in cooking). Salts should consist of iodized table salt. Mix

Ensure that you package the flour in an area that cannot get moist. Air tight containers are best. Also, label the flour so that you do not get it mixed up with your all-purpose flour.

Important Note:

While your bread may consist of fruits and nuts, it is not advised that you add anything to your flour except that which is needed to convert it to self-rising flour. As you are setting up the flour to create a chemical reaction, you should not add spices and other ingredients to the mixture which could compromise the process. Save your dehydrated fruits, nuts, and spices for when you are ready to bake your bread and then follow the recipe.

Why should you make self-rising flour?

From a prepper’s perspective, it may be more beneficial to stock up on bags of self-rising flour than to make it. Yet, this is not necessarily true. You will need to use all-purpose flour for many occasions and will rarely need to have the self-rising flour. Salt and Baking Powder should already be a part of your food storage. Therefore, you should already have everything that you need in order to make the flour. Why buy something extra that will take up additional space on your shelves?

flour

An additional benefit to making your own self-rising flour (or purchasing it) is that you will eliminate the need to store up on yeast. Granted, if you are planning on making wine you will need yeast, but for baking and other standard uses, the self-rising flour will work out just fine.

Financially making your own flour saves a ton of money. The average bag of all-purpose organic flour costs between $7 (for Gold Medal) to $54 (King Arthur Flour).  Making your own all-purpose flour costs you about $2. Plus, making your own self-rising flour eliminates the dyes and the bleach used in commercial brands. Bottom line, you get a better product that last longer for cheaper.

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