US Nuclear Target Map. Do You Live in The Danger Zone?

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How To Pick A Good Hunting Knife

What makes a good hunting knife.  There are five basic aspects that are very important, steel that can hold an edge, type of build, handle fit and feel, shape and function of the blade and the carry sheath.

Lets look at each of these.

1) First, you need a good piece of steel.

The blade must hold and edge well and be durable. Quality damascus fits that requirement great. If you are in the market for a damascus knife know that, while it holds a great edge, it requires maintenance.

Damascus represents an art of design and a level of craftsmanship commitment that gets passed on to the owner.

how to pick the perfect hunting knife

The maintenance is not a big deal but if you know you are the type of guy who doesn’t appreciate your tools to that level you should go stainless.

If maintenance free is your goal there are a few stainless options. The most important thing, again, is to be sure you get one that holds an edge and is durable.

There are many stainless options on the market these days and while some are great, some are garbage. Remember, the point of stainless is less maintenance but you want to achieve that without much compromise of its blade function.

For my money, D2 tool steel is the best choice for a knife.

While it is just under being considered true stainless it needs very little care and will hold an edge like to other.

One draw back, some say, is that it is harder to sharpen than a cheaper steel and that is true, you must spend a little more time getting the edge.

But when you are in the field and need a knife to cut and finish the job it is your steel. Being able to sharpen the blade easily is a plus so stay away from multi-faceted edged blades.

 

2) Second, the knife should be a full tang.  Period.

 

3) Third, the handle has to have excellent hold-ability even when it is bloody, wet or covered in fat.

I prefer the timeless unfinished wooden handles.

However, they need to be maintained by oiling them once in a while. If not they will absorb blood etc and and they can dry out and crack over time.

Raw wood is in the same class as damascus so do some honest soul searching before committing to your knife purchase.

If you find you are a maintenance free guy new resin based materials, such as G10, are great. The benefits of G10 is it is impervious to liquids, stable and very durable. The cons is they are fairly unimpressive in looks.

Definitely function over form.

Different layering of G10 can create a unique and desirable look if you can find the product. KRYTON handles have good surface grip but it does absorb moisture.

When cleaning fish of butchering the blood and other fluids will absorb into the handle and eventually that can get nasty. The most important factor is control and that is achieved by a good hand fit to the handle.

An intentional ergonomic design that stays in place should be sought out.

 

4) Fourth, the shape of the blade will determine how it functions.

If you want an all purpose knife you will need a blade that is strong enough to separate joints yet has a tip that is nimble enough to fit in awkward places.

It is also needs to have some belly in the blade towards the tip of the knife for skinning. I would stay away from fad gut hooks, mostly rookies use them and they get in the way when butchering. They are also very hard to sharpen.

The people who like them do so for the look and not the function and I admit I have seen some cool looking gut hook knives but they ate not going with me in the field.

Also, you don’t want a blade that is too long. I find that anywhere between 5-8 inches in blade length works well for whitetail size game.

 

5) Another thing commonly overlooked is a good sheath.

Most modern hunters don’t wear there knives in the field. They throw them in their packs and pull them out when needed.

However, if you wear yours in the field be sure that sheath has a strap or at least be sure it holds the knife firmly in place.  Is sad to lose a $150 knife walking through the woods in the dark because you had a good knife resting in a poorly fitted sheath.

Follow these tips and you should end up with a knife that becomes a beneficial partner in the field for life.

Good luck and safe hunting this season from all of us at Bliss Knife Works.

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10 Best Books About Survival Part 2

You’ve come to the right place if you’re looking for the 10 Best Books About Survival

this is part 2 of the “Best Books About Survival” list we have.

For part 1, visit the link here –> 10 Best Books About Survival

As a continuation we’re going to start at number 5…

5) SAS Survival Guide  

SAS Survival Handbook
This bestselling survival handbook written by ex-Special Air Service survival expert John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman contains some of the most reliable and respected survival info available.

From old-school navigation skills to up-to-date technologies like GPS, you can learn survival skills for any climate, on land or at sea. Disaster survival and other contemporary topics have been added to more recent additions of this popular and trusted book.

4) When All Hell Breaks Loose 

when all hell breaks loose

When All Hell Breaks Loose 
Another great read from Cody Lundin is his 2009 disaster survival guide, When All Hell Breaks Loose.

For those that liked 98.6 Degrees, you’ll love this large book filled with disaster preps and emergency skills. With topics ranging from bugging out, to building an emergency outdoor kitchen, to dealing with a dead body, there is a wealth of information covered in this very detailed book. This is not just a disaster survival or urban survival book; there are lessons in here for almost any type of emergency. This is one of my favorite books.

3) Peterson’s Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants 

Peterson’s Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants
Every survival library needs a copy of this book, and so does every Bug Out Bag. The 400 plants described in this book are found throughout the eastern half of the U.S., with many of them growing coast to coast.

This concise book tells you which wild plants to use for salad, tea, root vegetables, and many other foraged foods. Don’t let the black and white line drawings deter you.

This book has the details and an extensive number of plants that many slick-looking books with color photos are lacking. Never go hungry again with this book in your pocket.

2) Tom Brown’s Field Guide To Wilderness Survival 

Tom Brown’s Field Guide To Wilderness Survival
This back-to-basics book shows you how to take care of shelter, water, fire, food, tools, and supplies, along with instructions on identifying wild edible plants, tanning hides, improving your archery skills and much more.

This book, along with the author’s score of other books, have created an East Coast survival skills phenomenon.

1) The Outward Bound Wilderness First-Aid Handbook  

Outward Bound Wilderness First-Aid Handbook
This handbook by Jeffrey Isaac, PA-C, is a very detailed medical book, full of technical info written in easily understood language.

This book caters to the outdoorsy crowd and covers many scenarios that you would commonly face while in the wilderness. Muscular and skeletal injuries, toxins, cold injuries, dental problems, and many other ailments and injuries are explained and a variety of treatments are offered.

If this book doesn’t keep you in one piece on the way to the doctor, nothing will.

 

For part 1, visit the link here –> 10 Best Books About Survival

This Tent Will Change The Way We Think Of Camping! You Have To See This!

The future of camping is already here. It’s called The Orange Solar Tent and it brings technology and nature together at last.

United States design firm, Kaleidoscope, teamed up with UK telecommunications company, Orange Communications, to bring this idea to life.

The tents were originally designed for use at music festivals such as the Glastonbury Festival in the UK, but they would be perfect for camping anywhere at all.

Watch the video below to see how it works.

 

#1 Future Of Camping

Kaleidoscope and Orange Communication bring us this revolutionary new tent.

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#2 Sleeps 4

These tents can be deceiving, comfortably sleeping 4.

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#3 Festivals

Originally designed for festivals, campers got there hands on it and a new breed of camping was born.

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#4 Solar Cells

The solar cells provide heat naturally for the tent, while providing shade and heat reflection in the day.

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#5 Radiation Illumination

These tents are completely solar powered. Truly amazing.

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While we think that is badass…. it’s a little pricy compared to this Double Layer Waterproof Camping Tent

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The Bushcraft Brain Exposed – 20 Fascinating Facts

The Bushcraft Brain Exposed – 20 Fascinating Facts

Survivalist training and outdoor skills have been quickly growing in popularity in recent years. More people are choosing to learn how to survive in the wilderness with basic skills that were employed for thousands of years by humans.
These skills have earned the moniker “bushcraft.”Bushcraft enthusiasts have trained their brains to think differently when confronted with the untamed elements of the wilderness.

The skills and techniques these experts use are a mix of Old World methodology and modern technology without the help of electronics. Bushcraft goes back to basics and survival in its simplest and most practical forms.Inside the Bushcraft Brain

A bushcraft survivalist does not simply rely on tools and a few tricks to keep themselves alive in an unforeseen emergency.

A bushcraft survivalist learns how to survive in the wilderness, because they can. Tools are a big part of bushcraft, but bushcraft is much more than using a knife or hunting tools.
bushcraft brain exposed
The brains of a bushcraft survivalist are filled with information about their environment, the usefulness of plants, fire-building skills, shelter construction, water filtration, trap making and setting, navigation, and more.
Below are 20 interesting facts housed in the bushcraft brain.1. You Live Off the Land

Bushcraft isn’t an extended camping trip. It involves survival using what you have on hand and the environment surrounding you.

You are not trying to keep yourself going until you are rescued. You are building a livable space for yourself among the wilderness, harnessing nature’s vast resources for your own purposes.

2. You Start With a Good Knife

Any serious bushcraft survivalist won’t skimp on a quality knife.

A knife is a tool of many uses when wielded properly and efficiently. Bushcraft knives are sturdy and sharp, and can be used for everything from slicing materials for a fire to hunting and killing an animal when necessary.

3. Fire Can Be Made Numerous Ways

In bushcraft, matches and lighters are luxury, but not unheard of entirely. Other methods should always be in your arsenal of knowledge, too.

Bushcrafters learn how to make fire from a fire drill, striking rocks to form a spark, and the use of a mirror to reflect sunlight on tinder until it smolders.

4. You Must Respect Nature

Bushcrafters respect their environment and understand that they may not be the apex predator in the wilderness.

Blithely exploring a natural environment can get you hurt or killed. Be mindful of your surroundings including, animals, plants, insects, natural formations, water sources, and weather. Underestimating the wild is not just dangerous it’s stupid.

5. Your Clothing is Your Shelter

Building a shelter may be on the top of the list for an inexperienced survivalist, but you should consider shelter when you dress before heading out into the wilderness.

Your choice of clothing should keep you warm if necessary, protect your skin from sun, poisonous leaves, and poor weather conditions.

Clothing isn’t meant to be anything more than a temporary measure for shelter, but it should be fully utilized.

6. Hunting and Trapping Provides More Than a Meal

Part of bushcraft focuses on hunting and building trap devices to catch game and fish.

Without protein, the body has a more difficult time keeping up the energy needed to continue surviving in a harsh environment.

You should also learn skills on how to gut and break down different animals for food preparation and reusing certain parts of the animal like tendons and bones.

7. You Need To Be a Hunter-Gatherer

Hunting is useful, but is not guaranteed to result in a substantial meal every time out.

Foraging is an excellent way to sustain your diet when meat is unavailable. Edible plants and berries can be good sources of much needed vitamins that meat cannot provide.

8. Tracking Provides You With Information

Tracking animals is essential when hunting, but bushcrafters will tell you that you learn more than where an animal is located.

Animals can lead you to a viable water source or a food source you can forage. Keep in mind, animals need to eat and drink as well, and they are probably more familiar with their surroundings than you are.

9. Knot tying is a Versatile and Necessary Skill

Learning to tie a variety of knots can make or break your survival experience.

Knots are used to build shelters, fashioning tools or weapons, constructing rafts and traps, or creating equipment like baskets or sleds.

10. Water is Your Lifeblood

The need for a viable water cannot be overstated. Bushcrafters must know how to find, purify, filter, and store water.

Different methods can be employed to make water safe to drink, but boiling is among the most popular.

Traveling with a pot to boil and store water in is a good idea, but you should also have another vessel to collect rainwater, which doesn’t need to be filtered before drinking.

11. Waste Can Do You Harm

If you are fortunate enough to hunt down an animal, but there is too much meat to eat in one sitting, it is important that the meat does not go to waste.

Learn how to preserve the meat safely by drying or smoking the leftovers into jerky for later meals.

By allowing meat to rot, you could be throwing the only source of food you have away until more is obtained and that is easier said than done in the wilderness.

12. Food Attracts Other Predators

Bushcrafters are mindful that they are surrounded by living things. Butchered animals, cooking meat, or rotting flesh can attract other hungry animals to your camp.

Always keep food properly stored and discard unusable material far away, from where you’ve set up your camp.

13. Knowledge Can Keep You in Good Health

First aid skills are important because you are likely to be injured in some way while out in the wilderness. Without immediate access to help, you have only yourself to rely upon.

Natural remedies found in the environment can provide treatments for pain, fever, stomach upset, and other ailments, so do your homework!

14. Bleach Can Purify Water

A couple drops of bleach per pint of water can purify the water and make it safe to drink. The dirtier the water, the more drops you can add.

15. Dehydration Can Hit You Unexpectedly

You can become dehydrated without even realizing anything is wrong. Many body functions use water, using up what is already inside your body.

Drink water often and rest frequently, especially in hot weather.

16. Bushcrafting Requires Research

Learning about the environment you will bushcraft in is vital to your success in the wilderness.

Understanding a certain area allows you to get to know the layout of the area, the animals and plants, and which tools will be the most useful to you.

17. Packing Light Keeps You Nimble

Bringing tools you don’t need or are wrong for an environment is a waste of space and can weigh you down. You will move much faster if you are not encumbered by useless items.

18. Pine Needles Make a Great Tea

Fresh, green pine needles can be steeped in boiling water to drink for a Vitamin C boost. This is especially helpful if you are feeling under the weather.

19. Bushcrafting With a Partner Can Keep You Sane

A bushcraft experience can become lonely after awhile. Bringing a partner gives you someone to commiserate with and share the workload.

20. Documenting Your Experience is Part of the Learning

Keep an accurate account of your experiences as they happen in a journal.

Bushcraft is a collection of skills that take time to hone and mistakes will inevitably be made.

You will learn faster if you teach yourself how and what to improve upon.

Steven Tyler’s New Country Song With Off The Grid, Gypsy, Hippie Music Video Goes Viral

In this great new music video, Steven Tyler is no stranger to the trends sweeping our planet.  It is a return to Hippie with an Off The Grid twist.  It is loving nature, home and family grown.

steventyleroffgrid

With the addition of the Gypsy wagon, a drum circle in the field, and the shot of him standing in front of the giant tree, Steven portrays a human love and care for nature while singing country about love.

gypsie

 

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Survival Gear: 10 Must Have Items to Survive When SHTF

Survival Gear; 10 Must Have Items to Survive When SHTF

Millions of Americans believe that in the not-too-distant future, America, and possibly the entire world, could be mired in a disaster of epic, Armageddon-sized proportions.
Whether it comes from social upheaval, natural, act-of-God disasters, economic failure, world war, or even extraterrestrial attack, concerned individuals are preparing for the worst.
Collectively, the apocalyptic event is known as when the SHTF, and is expected to be the ultimate challenge to mankind’s survival.
SHTF stands for Sh*t Hits the Fan.The Internet is fairly replete with information on what to expect and how to prepare for such a catastrophe.
Individuals preparing for impending doom are called doomsday preppers.
However, even governments have accepted the possibility of a rapid, virtually overnight natural disaster, or the total downfall of organized, civilized society.Huge underground warehouses have been constructed and are being stocked with seeds from nearly every tree and plant known to man.
In addition, animal and human DNA and the most beneficial medicines are also being stocked to give humanity a chance to survive any impending disaster or even the Armageddon, be it natural, extraterrestrial, or man-made.

survival gear

10 Things You Should Have in Your SHTF Survival Supplies

Whether you have a family or are an individual, there are certain things that are crucial to your survival in the event of a local, national, or worldwide calamity. You will need to provide food, water and shelter; those are the big three you will need for you and your family to survive.

Any creature comfort-related items beyond that won’t be absolutely necessary in an emergency. If you have the ability and resources to satisfy additional needs and desires, that is fine, but the primary three needs are what will help you survive and what deserve your focus.

The following list of basic items should be included in your survival kit, or bug out bag.

1. Tool For Cutting or Chopping

This item should be of substantial size to accommodate cutting or chopping down trees for cooking, warmth, and possibly even shelter requirements.

A hatchet or large survival knife, complete with a honing stone and sheath or carrying case is preferred. A hatchet may also be used as a hammer.

Some survival knives even have tools in the handle, things like: compass, string saw, light fishing tackle and even a small sewing kit.

2. Multi-Purpose Tool

A multi-purpose tool has a number of elements that go beyond simple cutting, making the multi-purpose tool an exceptional item to have.

survival gear
Things like scissors, knife, screwdriver, pliers, can opener, bottle opener, and other attached tools are not as frivolous as they may seem.
In a true survival situation that impacts entire cities, regions, or countries, you may need to scavenge for foodstuffs.
Fresh foods may be contaminated; even if they aren’t contaminated, they are not going to last for long; canned goods, bottled water and other liquids may be your only options.

The additional tools can be used for animal skinning and constructing or maintaining a functional shelter.

3. Water Purification or Filtration

Fresh water may be contaminated; that will require purifying or desalinating water to satisfy hydration needs.

Humans can survive only a few days without fresh water.
There is a variety of items available online that can be used hundreds or even thousands of times.

It is highly recommended that your survival kit includes several.

4. Fire Starter

Matches are fine, but they can be easily ruined by water or even humidity and mildew. It is best to go with what is called a permanent match, or a flint or magnesium rod.

The permanent match is an enclosed “match” that stores inside a metal container and lights up when removed from the container.
click here to get yours
The flint and magnesium rods, when scraped with a steel object such as a knife blade, create sparks that will ignite dry tinder and paper.

In the eventuality that you do not have any tinder or paper, cotton balls soaked with petroleum jelly will work exceptionally well.

5. Duct Tape

There are far too many practical, helpful uses for duct tape to list here.

However, a few of them are: fire starting, building and repairing furniture, building and maintaining a shelter, emergency first aid care, crafting an emergency glass or bowl, and repairing tools.

There are entire websites devoted to the use of duct tape for a vast array of uses. Include as much duct tape in your survival kit as you possibly can; you will not regret it.

6. First Aid and Emergency Kit

Include basics like band aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometer, compass, antibiotics and painkillers.

Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible if possible so it will conform to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and use less space.

A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.

7. Para-Cord or Rope

Para-cord is the cord that keeps parachutists safely attached to their parachutes when jumping.

It is also what individuals use for rock climbing, and is designed to be super strong and durable. However, rope is a good replacement in emergency situations because paracord can be used for shelter building, rescue, perimeter security, traversing structures and much more.

FYI – paracord doesn’t work as a suitable replacement for climbing rope, however in an emergency situation it may be a last resort that you can use while still keeping your bug out bag light enough to carry. If you have extra room, we highly recommend adding climbing rope if you absolutely believe you’ll need it.

8. Fishing Gear

If you have enough room for a fishing rod and reel, that’s great. However, only the basics are really necessary: lures, fish eggs, and fishing line will work.

You can always organize and cast the fishing line using a tin can, bottle, or stick.

If you can dig up worms with a flat stone, or even your axe or knife, that will help too. Grubs, caterpillars and other bugs also make great bait.

9. Poncho

In addition to being good as rain gear, a poncho can also be used for shelter and even for warmth if necessary.

It can also be used as an over-the-shoulder bag for carrying stuff, or it can be used to construct a travois, or litter, to carry wood, supplies, or an injured person.

10. Flashlight and Extra Batteries

A reliable, compact LED flashlight is indispensable for the purposes discussed here.

The ideal way to supplement a regular flashlight is to get one that recharges by turning the attached handle; the light does not last as long as a regular flashlight, but they are perfect for non-emergency use to save battery power in the LED flashlights.
And if you do run out of batteries, a rechargeable flashlight will at least provide you with some light.Remember that most batteries, after they have run out, will regenerate somewhat after a few weeks or longer if just left alone outside of the flashlight.
Also, if flashlights are going to be stored for days or longer, remove the batteries so they don’t slowly drain.Obviously, if you have a family to care for and protect, you should try to fit multiples of some of the aforementioned items, like: water purification and filtration items; first aid supplies, fishing gear and extra batteries.
flashlights-for-americans
If possible, each teen and adult should have their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag.While the chances of such a disastrous event, one that would impact the entire United States or the world, may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.
Earth has a fragile ecosystem, which many think is being compromised by human irresponsibility; scientists do not discount major earthquakes or meteor crashes in our not-too-distant future; religious conflicts and terrorism are on the increase; reported extraterrestrial activities on and around our planet have also increased.Being prepared for any eventuality is always a good thing, and it is the prudent individual who takes heed. If you are of that mold, then the aforementioned 10 items should be in your survival plan.Keep this survival gear in mind.

7 Habits of People With Remarkable Mental Toughness Part 3

This is part 3 of the 7 Habits of People With Remarkable Mental Toughness series..

Click here for part 1 of 7 Habits of People With Remarkable Mental Toughness

or Click here for part 2 of 7 Habits of People With Remarkable Mental Toughness

Being mentally tough is a very impressive way to live.

People that have this extraordinary ability have trained themselves to behave in this particular way.

Since it takes concentration and focus, you will need to understand that there are habits that these people utilize.

They practice these habits on a regular basis. It becomes second nature for them to be on top of things in order to get more done on a regular basis.

When you use the 7 habits of the mentally tough, you will able to have your life in order.

Mentally tough people have priorities that they stick to, and they continue to handle their responsibilities making them very successful in all areas of their life.

Here are the 7 habits that you can use to increase your mental toughness. You should begin to do them on a regular basis and practice them thoroughly.

1. Focus on what is important in your life.

Developing the ability to focus on certain issues takes training.

It’s important to write down your goals and attain them.

In order to reach your goals, you need to focus on them at all times so that you can succeed in getting what you want in life.

Take a small notebook and write down your goals.

As you achieve them, you can mark them off. Once you develop other goals write them down to.

Always strive to have a variety of goals that you want to achieve in your life so that you work hard to attain them at all times.

2. Do not concentrate on failures, but decide to remain positive about your successes.

The people that can see that they aren’t perfect have been able to continue to try to improve on their positive traits.

This allows them to leave the failures behind them and move on.

When you have something that goes wrong, and you inevitably will, it’s important to put it behind you.

Not everyone just goes through life getting everything that they want, but the trick is to not dwell on the bad aspects, but to totally increase your ability to see how well you have completed several accomplishments in your life.

Take a notebook and write down all of your accomplishments.

Concentrate on them so that you can always use them as a basis for your continuing successes.

This exercise is simple and works well.

You will know what all you have done and feel better about yourself in the process.

Never spend any time dwelling on your failures because it will lead to a lack of energy to increase the positive aspects into your life.

If someone you know or love has a problem with focusing on their successes and always complaining about their failures, you can have them practice concentrating on their successes too.

Sometimes having more people involved can lead to a great amount of positive energy.

3. Practice letting things that are no longer important to leave your mind so there is more room for what is important and retain it.

Since brain matter doesn’t retain everything all the time, you will want to let the unimportant things go.

When they are freed from the brain matter, there will be many more thoughts and processes that can enter the space.

Keep the great information, and what is outdated and from the past will be let go.

Once you get used to doing this, it becomes easier to let those unnecessary aspects out of your mind so that you don’t think of them.

Think of it like cleaning out your closet and getting rid of older clothes.

It’s the same kind of process with letting the older and outdated issues to leave your mind.

If it’s difficult for to do at first, just keep trying to let those parts of your memory leave and gradually they will.

4. There is always more than one way to get things done.

remarkable mental toughness

It’s important to remember that there are always other avenues to take when something needs to be accomplished.

Mentally tough people know this. They are always looking for other ways to complete tasks in the fastest way possible. It’s a good habit to get into. Always look for other ways that will allow you to fit more into your life in an easy way.

A good way to put this into perspective is to think about a computer.

There is more than one way to save your projects, and they accomplish the same goal. This type of behavior is necessary in order to move onto bigger and better things in your life.

5. Just like a physical athlete trains their muscles, a mentally tough person needs to exercise their mind on a regular basis.

Learning more and staying interested is a must for the mentally tough. You will fare batter by striving to achieve more and more brainpower by doing mental exercises every day.

Crossword and word search puzzles are extremely beneficial for keeping the brain working and engaged. Lots of people enjoy gathering family and friends around them when they want to get involved in these types of puzzles to add power to their brains.

Reading the latest events will also keep your brain functioning well. Newspapers and the Internet provide excellent sources for having the information that you need right on hand.

6. Boredom will create a lackadaisical way of life, so it’s important that a person cultivate many interests in their life.

Getting bored will lead to complacency. Mentally tough people are never bored.

They create new and interesting things to do in their life in order to stay engaged in the present and look forward to the future.

They constantly strive to encourage themselves to find new and better pastimes that challenge themselves.

You will want to make sure that you have interesting things to do. If you do find yourself bored, strive to attain something else in your life that you can work at to bring back your interest in obtaining a healthier attitude.

Taking a class is a great way to develop a better mental attitude and keeping yourself from getting bored. You can take classes online so you can fit it in when it is convenient for you.

If you want to teach a class, is another way to keep from getting bored in your life. Helping others to learn something that you’re good at is a way to give to others and know that you are capable in that area.

7. Refuse to have a negative attitude, and cultivate positive influences in your life.

Having a negative attitude will bring you down in many areas of your life.

Make sure that you continue to look to the future with an open mind and heart. Mentally tough people see adversity as a catalyst to bring about changes that will benefit their life.

They don’t dwell on what is negative, but use it to help them to achieve even greater things in life.

Since this can be a difficult thing to do, you need to make sure that you’re constantly putting positive influences in your life instead of the negative issues that will always be present in life at one point or another.

This will get you in the habit of looking on the brighter side of things versus the opposite way. Having the ability to do this is something that you should strive for on a daily basis.

You can use positive affirmations on a daily basis to keep the negative aspects from taking over.

Have your positive affirmation somewhere that you will see them.

Good places to put them are your desk, your dresser or on a bathroom mirror.

Take a look at this video of Jessica’s Daily Affirmations and you’ll get the idea!

At work, you can keep them next to your workspace in order to be able to read them often. These positive affirmations allow you to be constantly giving yourself a boost and believing in the better aspects of life will increase your ability to handle the daily pressures in your life.

Practice these positive affirmations with other members of the family too. Allow them to get the advantages too.

Practicing reading them as a family is a good idea because it will develop family unity and encourage all members of the family to strive to make the most out of their lives too.

Being absolutely stringent on following these 7 habits will allow you to become a mentally tough person.

Since you can do these things on a regular basis, once you develop these habits, they will come easy and natural for you.

In all cases, becoming mentally tough can lead to remarkable successes in your life. It is something that you will want to strive for to increase the enjoyment you will have in all areas of your life.

A mentally tough person is a happy and healthy person too.

You can and will be able to be this type of person when you practice the 7 habits regularly.

If you haven’t read part 1 or part 2 click the link to read them.

Top 10 Survival Gear Mistakes To Avoid

If you’ve ever prepared for an extreme expedition — scaling one of the Seven Summits or traipsing the wilds of the Amazon — then you know that things will go wrong all of the time.

A courageous adventure into the wild means that you have to be prepared to face the challenges and the obstacles that come from being in a remote part of the world without the conveniences of the modern world.

That’s why it’s so important to prepare ahead as much as you can and to anticipate the mishaps that could occur.

I’ve been through enough situations out in the wilderness to know that if something is going to wrong, it probably will.

Sometimes you can’t change the fact that danger or extreme conditions are ahead.

What you can do is prepare for the worst and be happy you can survive with the very best of them when the situation presents itself.

If you are ready to prepare for your adventure of a lifetime, then follow my guide listing the “Top 10 Survival Gear Mistakes To Avoid.”

When you find yourself lost in the Arctic tundra, you’ll be happy you packed the right gear to get you through the night and into the next day of trekking.

This guide will get you there, so let’s get started with these tips to avoid disaster with your gear!

1. Failing to Have an Emergency Plan

The first mistake many novice trekkers make when they are planning their first expedition is to not fully think through their emergency plan.

You can mitigate disaster simply by having the right gear to get you out of a terrible situation.

emergency plan

survival gear

 

That means purchasing a Personal Beacon Locator (PBL), a small battery-operate device that you can activate with the push of a button.

It communicates with global satellites, and let’s emergency responders know where to find you. Hopefully nothing will go wrong.

But if it does, your PBL will get you out of a hairy situation.

2. Forgetting Your Rain Gear

Don’t skimp on the rain gear. It’s going to rain most locales you go — at some point.

It’s better to have a weather-resistant outer layer, a rain jacket, rain pants and weather-resistant boots packed in your backpack for the times when the thunderstorms wreak havoc on your campsite.

You don’t want to be wet and cold.

You can get hypothermia, and at the very least, you’ll be miserable.

It takes a long time for drenched camping clothes to dry out — especially if it is damp for several days.

3. Not Enough Food

One of the biggest mistakes you can make is fail to pack too little food. You need food to keep up your energy.

There are resourceful ways you can pack high-energy food that does not take up a lot of room and that is lightweight.

For example, pack a mix of energy bars, trail mix, dried fruit, vitamins and dehydrated food that comes alive when boiled.

If you are going to overpack anything, then overpacking lightweight food that is high in energy and protein is always Okay.

4. Dry Like a Desert

Invest in water bottles and water filtration systems. You can’t rely on just one water bottle.

Pack at least two traditional water bottles — some have built-in purification systems. Also consider a water pack that you can wear on your back.

It has tubes that you can use to drink water as you walk.

Finally, have a backup supply of water purification tablets or a water purification wand that literally can turn dirty freshwater into clean drinking water.

5. Shiver Me Timbers

Another big mistake you can make with your gear is to fail to pack the clothing and gear that will keep you warm.

That means everything from a sub-zero sleeping bag that helps to regulate your body temperature, to warm wool socks, to hand and toe warmers for emergency situations.

Always prepare for the onslaught of a chilly night.

You don’t want to risk hypothermia or frostbite — especially if you are out on the trail all alone.

Prepare ahead to stay warm.

6. Alone in the Darkness

Don’t leave home with without several gadgets and tools that can give you light in the midst of darkness.

For example, consider packing a headlamp, a solar-powered lantern, a batch of strike-anywhere matches, a lighter, and a battery-operated heater.

You’ll want to be able to light a fire and see what you are doing no matter what the conditions are.

Sometimes you will find yourself at a rainy campsite and you won’t be able to start a blazing fire.

That’s where your mini, battery-operated heater will come in handy.

You’ll also be loving your situation when you can just flip on your handy headlamp to read, prepare dinner in the darkness, set up your tent, and do a myriad other activities that require more hands than you have to spare.

7. Where Am I?

It’s likely that at some point you will get lost.

Two of the most economical and important gear items you can pack is a compass and a set up maps.

Compasses are lightweight and crucial. They can always get you back on the right track. Paper maps are easy to pack and to pull out — just make sure you are protecting them.

Either buy foldable plastic ones that cannot get damaged by water, or pack your paper maps in a plastic baggie.

 

8. Leaving the Duct Tape at Home

You may not think of it at first, but packing some simple items like duct tape, rope, a hunting knife and a small toolkit with a hammer, nails and fish hooks will be helpful to you when your gear ruptures or breaks.

There is nothing worse than to get to your campsite only to find a raccoon ate through part of your sleeping bag.

Patch up that hole with duct tape! Find that your tent is swaying in a gusty wind? Secure it with a length of rope.

9. No Motivation

You may think it’s trivial at first, but it’s really important to make sure a personal memento is on your gear list.

When you get lonely out in the woods or when you face a real disaster that forces you to consider whether you are willing to fight for your life, your personal memento (photos of loved ones, a sentimental item, a love letter) will motivate you to continue working hard to get out of your current situation.

Many people have endured extreme conditions by the sheer motivation of a photo that reminds them that love is worth fighting for — so don’t forget the memento.

It may have more power than you think in the long run.

10. Packing Too Much

Now that I’ve given you a list of gear mistakes to avoid and told you the top things you need to pack, I want to remind you that there is something as packing too much.

One novice mistake is to overpack your gear.

Sometimes it takes more than one go-around to get the right mix of gear and to get your pack to feel manageable. Remember that it is going to be on your back and you have to carry it for hours at a time for many days. So choose your gear wisely.

Top 10 Survival Gear Mistakes To Avoid

10 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Survival Food Supply

Does the thrill of a new adventure keep you traveling the world — planning your next expedition to far-flung locales?

Do you plan for months for your big adventures only to find something goes wrong while scaling that mountain or hiking that trail?

If you’ve encountered a mishap while out in the wild, you’re certainly not alone.

survival food supply

 

When you traverse remote terrain, it’s almost inevitable that something will go wrong at some point — and that’s why you need to be as prepared as possible to take on the challenge and to improvise when it really counts.

One way you can immediately change your current wilderness obstacles around is to know how to improve your survival food supply.

With a little creative thinking and a little research ahead of your trip, you will be able to live off the land until you can make it out of the proverbial and literal woods.

If we want to learn how to survive in the wild, we need only look back to the very first survivalists — our ancestors made it through life eating the plants of the forest and later fishing and hunting animals.

You can do the same with a little practice.

Follow our guide of “10 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Survival Food Supply,” and you’ll be prepared to take on any food insecurity challenge during your next big adventure.

Let’s start hunting and gathering:

1. Make High-Energy Trail Mix

Because of the strenuous exercise you’ll endure during your expedition, you always need to be eating and hydrating.

One of the easiest ways to supplement your food supply is to make a batch of high-energy trail mix.

Not only is trail mix healthy and boosts your energy levels, it’s fairly cheap. Make a big batch using unsalted nuts of your living, dried fruit and karob chips.

Pack the high-energy trail mix in small bags and pack them in your backpack. Whenever you need a little boost, grab a bag and eat.

2. Pack Energy Bars

Pack energy bars to ensure that you always have access to a healthy snack.

The best feature of energy bars is that they are lightweight and packable.

You can slip them into the nooks and crannies of your backpack so that you always have something to satiate your hunger until you can get to your campsite to start the fire and cook dinner.

3. Study Edible Plants

At some point you may find yourself in a remote forest without an animal in sight. This is where your gathering instincts will need to come in.

You can forage any forest for delicious mushrooms and green plants.

The key is knowing which ones you can safely digest. If you’re going solo on your trip, you especially don’t want to get sick and poisoned by eating a plant that is not edible.

So study the forest plants in the area where you will be traveling.

Consider purchasing a pocket guide that identifies the plants that are safe to eat. When your food supply is getting low, you literally can live off the bounty of the forest.

4. Pack Fishing Line and Hooks

As your travel, you are likely to happen upon a river or body of water with fish. This is where a rudimentary fishing pole can really help you out.

So pack a small fishing kit that includes a few hooks and fishing line.

You can attach the line to a sturdy stick, tie it to a large branch stretching over the water, or use just the fishing line to catch a fish or two for your campsite dinner.

A beginner’s tip: You’ll want to make sure these items are in a hard plastic case instead of a flimsy plastic bag.

You don’t want an injury from hooks poking out of your pack.

5. Prepare a Mini Chef’s Kit

Once you’ve caught your fish for dinner, you’ll need to be able to prepare them for the open-fire skillet.

So make sure you’ve prepared a mini chef’s kit.

This can be very simple — a hunting knife, some aluminum foil or parchment paper, and a meat/fish thermometer.

Of course, not all of these items are essential.

You probably can cook fish without a thermometer. But it’s also nice to be safer than sorry when cooking fish and meat, so bring it along if you can make room.

A mini chef’s kit sounds luxurious, and it will feel that way if you get the opportunity to eat something other than trail mix and forest mushrooms.

6. Pack Water Purification Supplies

Your survival food supply is not complete without an endless amount of clean water.

You need water to stay hydrated so you can continue on with your expedition, and that’s why this is one component of your food supply that you really have to pay attention to and prepare for, as you don’t know what kinds of conditions you ultimately will meet out on the trail.

Food will only go so far.

Without water you can get very sick.

Dehydration sneaks up on you quickly, so prepare ahead of time to be able to transform any freshwater into safe drinking water by investing in some kind of packable water purification solution — such as a wand or purification tablets.

7. Purchase Flavored Water Tablets

Every now and then, it will feel good to drink something other than water.

Packing a few flavored water tablets that you can just add to your bottled water will feel like a treat. In addition, many flavored water tablets also can be good for you.

Look for tablets that include a dose of Vitamin C, for example. You probably can’t drink OJ on the trail, but this solution is a good second option.

8. Invest in a Multi-Vitamin

When you are eating a limited amount of food — and a limited kind of food — your body may not be getting all of the vitamins and nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

Your iron levels, for example, can drop very low if you are eating mostly vegetables and plants, and low iron can lead to all kinds of health problems including depression.

To mitigate this risk, consider investing in a multi-vitamin. It will boost your food supply by giving your body the vitamins you are missing in your daily trail diet.

9. Pack a Lighter

Have a lighter on hand at all times. This is important because you always want access to fire.

When you have the option to cook a meal you’ve collected from the wild, you’ll want to take it. Forest mushrooms can be delicious — but even more so when cooked on an open fire.

click here to get yours

 

If you catch a fish but can’t cook it, you may be in trouble if you eat it raw.

So prepare ahead by packing a lighter. You’ll diversify your food supply in innumerable ways with this simple gadget.

10. Throw in a Bottle of All Spice

After a while, all trail food can taste a little bland.

If you’ve got room, through in a bottle of all spice.

This works well on everything you might gather from the forest — from making a salad of forest plants and flowers to seasoning fish.

It’s a small luxury that will make reaching the campsite each night even sweeter.

What would you include? Let us know in the comments section below:

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11 Things I Wish I Knew About Survival Gear When I First Started

11 Things I Wish I Knew About Survival Gear When I First Started

If you’re an adventure seeker like me, you know how thrilling it can be to take on the next new challenge.

I’ve climbed the Seven Summits, hiked through the Amazon and camped out in more remote map dots around the globe than I can count.

What I’ve learned over the years is that having the right survival gear is key to a successful mission.

Without the right survival gear you’re either miserable or worse, injured or dead, so it’s important to make wise choices.

U.S. Marine Lt. Heath Clifford with Marine Aircraft Group-29 (MAG-29), uses a mirror to signal a MV-22B Osprey during a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel (TRAP) exercise aboard Al Asad Air Base, Iraq on October 23, 2007. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Michael Haas) (Released)

Image Source: Wikipedia

 

Why invest so much time, money and training into an extreme adventure only to have it fall apart because you didn’t have the right gear?

Read on to learn from me in my guide, “11 Things I Wish I Knew About Survival Gear When I First Started.”

You’re on your way to a successful mission if you can prepare ahead of time and get the right gear lined up.

Let’s get started:

1. Not All Gear Is Created Equal

First things first: Not all gear is created equal. You want to save money, save it on the things that you really can skimp on — like generic hand sanitizer for your first aid kit.

Don’t skimp on the important gear that is going to keep you alive in extreme conditions.

You really do need the sub-zero sleeping bag if you’re going into the Arctic.

Save your money and budget wisely.

Having the top gear that matches the rigors of your trip matters.

2. Don’t Forget the Headlamp

The headlamp is a life-saver no matter where you’re adventure may take you.

It makes everything easy. Gutting a fish in pitch blackness?

The headlamp saves you. Trying to set up your tent under the stars? The headlamp saves you.

Writing home to mom? You get the picture.

Buy the headlamp. Click here to get yours today.

They come in a variety of sizes and colors, which makes selecting one fun, and many have a long battery life.

Make sure to pack extra batteries, however, because you’ll probably be using the headlamp for long periods of time, and you’ll always want to have access to light.

3. If You Have the Choice, Buy Waterproof

It doesn’t matter where you go, at some point it’s going to rain. And it probably will rain a lot.

There is nothing more miserable than being tired and cold and wet.

You can get sick very quickly, and so you need to prepare ahead for damp conditions. If gear that you are eying has a waterproof option, then buy it.

It’s better to be safe than to be soaking wet.

Consider getting waterproof pants, a jacket and boots.

Make sure your tent is weather resistant and is made to withstand extreme weather and temperatures.

4. Invest in a Sub-Zero Sleeping Bag

When it’s cold, it’s cold — and there’s nothing that a fire can do to help.

Sub-zero sleeping bags are designed to keep you toasty when the world outside is shuddering.

They come at a price, but again, this is an item you don’t want to skimp on.

It’s important for your body heat to stay at a normal temperature so that you don’t get hypothermia.

5. Never Leave Home Without an Emergency First Aid Kit

Things are going to happen.

You’ll cut your finger with a fishing hook.

You’ll stumble on the mountain and twist your ankle.

You’ll need triage, and you’ll be the only person to do it.

So make sure you’ve got an emergency first aid kit complete with all of the items you need to sanitize, bandage and even splint.

You’ll be thanking yourself when those moments arrive.

6. Bring Back-Up Hydration

Water equals survival, so it’s wise not to just have one water bottle (What happens when it floats down the river?). Have back-up hydration that is packable.

There are lots of water packs designed for easy transport. And while you’re at it, it doesn’t hurt to carry a few packs of water purification tablets.

These will be a lifesaver when you can’t find clean drinking water and you need to be hydrated quickly.

7. Buy Gear That Retracts and Backs

One of the most important lessons I’ve learned as I’ve completed by missions is that you’ve got to be able to carry and unload your gear quickly and easily.

Lots of survival gear is made to pack up tightly and retract easily.

Look for those convenient features in the gear you buy so that everything rolls and packs nicely and makes it easier for you to get from Point A to Point B.

8. Your Head and Your Toes

Your head and your toes are too of the most important parts of your body to protect when you are trying to survive in the wilderness.

Most of your body heat escapes through your head, so make sure you’re protecting it with the right gear if you’re going into bitterly cold environments.

The same advice goes to your toes.

Invest in good all-weather boots that are going to protect your toes and keep them warm.

You don’t want to get frostbite in the wilderness and lose your toes as a result.

9. Light a Fire

It’s always good to carry a cigarette lighter, and if you can fit in it, a fire starter.

click here to get yours

 

Sometimes you’ll find that the wood at your camp site is too damp, and you’ll need to start the fire with a little dry kindling you’ve brought along.

Having a working lighter is easy to pack and will make it a cinch to get that fire going on those cold camping nights.

If you think it might rain in the location where you’ll be camping for the night, be looking for dry wood to collect as you make your way.

Depending on where you are, the weather can change quickly, so it’s wise to gather supplies where you can and to always be anticipating the most important thing about building a campsite — how you are going to start your fire.

10. Get a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)or a Satellite Phone

There was one time I got very lost in the middle of the Canadian wilderness.

But I had a little device called a Personal Locator Beacon, or a PLB.

This little device allowed me to send out a signal to let rescue personnel know that I needed help. It was very easy to use.

Literally at the push of a button, you can send a signal that is beamed up to the satellites of the world and let’s the emergency spirits know you are in need of help.

It doesn’t matter where you are in the world. The Personal Locator Beacon will work for you.

It is your beacon.

The Personal Locator Beacon was one of the more expensive items I’ve invested in for my adventures because it cost several hundred dollars, but it was well worth the investment, as who knows what would have happened to me out there in the wilderness, otherwise.

Emergency responders found me, and they got me back on the right track.

Additionally, you also can consider purchasing a satellite phone.

Again, they aren’t cheap, but they another option for getting emergency help quickly, especially if you don’t purchase the Personal Locator Beacon, and the satellite phone allows you to have an actual conversation with another human being.

11. The Good Old-Fashioned Compass

Some things never change, and that it true for carrying a compass on your adventure. Invariably, you will get lost.

I told you about one mishap, but it’s happened many times to me.

Compasses today are very accurate and smart thanks to new technology, and so it’s wise to invest in one in case you are off the beaten path and need to get back on it.

Best of all, these gadgets are fairly cheap in comparison to many of the survival gear items you’ll buy in preparation for your trip.

Grandpa Just Wanted To Take His Kids Fishing, But He Ended Up Blowing Their Minds

Fishing is easily one of the most fun activities to do in the ocean. It has one major drawback, however: Sitting on a boat in the middle of nowhere can often get quite mundane. After all, what can you do to add a little excitement to your fishing?

This grandpa has an idea on how to make fishing riveting. He uses some old-school methods of striking fear into the hearts of fish everywhere, and it takes his family by total surprise.

(via ViralHog)

Don’t ever doubt grandpa’s quick hands again. Those fishing skills didn’t come to him overnight; he’s probably been fishing like that for decades.

Start taking notes, kids.

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Take A Look At This Island Where Everybody Lives Completely “Off The Grid”

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As you have probably noticed, the number of people choosing to live “off the grid” these days has been increasing at a rapid rate. Everyone has different reasons for why they choose to move off the grid and we came across something we thought would be a great share for you.

An island approximately one hour off of the coast of Vancouver is a great example of what it possible.

It’s called Lasqueti, and it sits between Vancouver and Vancouver Island. It has a population of about 400 people, and again, it’s completely off grid. It’s not connected to British Colombia’s hydro power infrastructure, and residents are responsible for using alternative methods of generating electricity, like solar power.

As a reader of our site here, you’re probably familiar with the concept of living off the grid, but it you aren’t 100% sure it means that you are totally independent, living without reliance on utility corporations or anything else.

“It does not mean living in the stone age, it’s not about bush craft. It’s about generating your own power, your own water, dealing with your own waste. Probably as part of a community, not living on your own like a hermit. It’s also about being more self-reliant and being less dependent on the system. Perhaps realizing that the system isn’t really protecting us anymore and we have to look after ourselves.” – George Noory From Coast To Coast Am

 

 

Here’s something that you should keep in mind…

Important: “Off Grid Living Doesn’t Have To Be So “Primitive”

When most people think about living “off the grid” it brings up the image of a stone-aged type lifestyle and not really enjoying life like you have become accustomed to. That is not the truth as you saw in the video above.

The beauty of how technology has been evolving is that we have the opportunity to have and use the items we currently do in our normal life, but do it independent of corporate influence.

There is an enormous potential for the entire human race to live completely “off the grid” and still keep their current lifestyle.

The biggest issue currently is generating power and we have some information on how you can do that if you’d like in the resources below.

– Top 10 Reasons To Use Green Energy

The Truth About Solar Panels

– Preparing for Extended Power Loss: What You Need To Know

The world’s largest private bank, UBS, is urging investors to join the clean, renewable energy movement. Analysts at the bank say that power plants in Europe might be extinct within the next 10 to 20 years.

Most of the plants retiring in the future will not be replaced, large scale power plants could be on the path to extinction.”(source)

How Will The Entire World Go Off Grid? How Will It Not Be So “Primitive?”

There are many ways we could go off grid and provide power to the entire planet. While we don’t have time to list them all in this article, we will share with you a few general ideas. (More info is available here on our blog if you’re really curious, we know many of you are)

We could populate the world’s deserts with solar panels and we could also use wind turbines, or vortex induced vibrations (ocean currents) or a combination of them all.

Here’s another quote that will get you asking “why haven’t we done this yet?”

“If we could harness 0.1 percent of the energy in the ocean, we could support the energy needs of 15 billion people. In the English Channel, for example, there is a very strong current, so you produce a lot of power.”– Michael Bernitsas, Professor of Naval Architecture at the University of Michigan

You can read more about the research that’s come from Professor Bernitsas here.

The point we’re sharing here is that there are many viable and affordable solutions. If we really wanted to, it would be possible and it has been proven to be possible like in the video above.

Have you seen anything that would be useful with life off the grid that we could share with our readers?

Leave a comment below!

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Top 30 Most Influential People In Bushcraft

Top 30 Most Influential People In Bushcraft

Bushcraft is gaining popularity in a modern world where we are separated from nature. Those skills once considered necessary to live have fallen to the wayside in modern times.

Bushcraft Pioneers

There are several influential personalities who have brought attention to the importance of these skills. Among these are the modern-day founders of bushcraft, TV personalities, authors, leaders, experts, and historical figures.

Founders

 

1. Les Hiddins

Les Hiddins is famously known for his expertise in survival research. He was responsible for the Australian Army’s military survival manual in 1987.

He inspired a television series and sparked the modern interest in bushcraft.

2. Mors Kochanski

This Canadian bushcraft instructor became internationally recognized for his knowledge concerning wilderness survival. He has been enlisted to instruct civilians and military members across the globe and has been dubbed the modern founder of Northern bushcraft.

TV Personalities

 

3. Bear Grylls

Most well known for his television series, “Man vs. Wild,” this amazing survivalist has climbed Mt. Everest, paramotored over the Himalayas, and been named the youngest Chief Scout ever appointed.

4. Cody Lundin

Popularized by co-hosting “Dual Survival,” Lundin continues to live off-the-grid and teach survival and primitive living skills.

5. David Canterbury

He co-starred on “Dual Survival” and authored the bestseller “Bushcraft 101.”

Currently he instructs and owns “the Pathfinder School LLC,” and has a YouTube channel filled with survival instruction videos.

6. Les Stroud

Stroud is a wilderness guide, instructor, musician, filmmaker, and the genius behind several survival skill television programs. He is literally “Survivorman.”

7. Mykel Hawke

This retired U.S. Army Special Forces officer has appeared on several television shows highlighting his survival skills.

8. Ray Mears

This amazing man has published 12 books and produced 17 television series focusing on bushcraft and extreme survival skills.

9. Ron Hood

This Vietnam vet started Survival.com which is now considered to be one of the best survival training aides. He has also been featured on numerous television shows and taught wilderness skills at UCLA for over 20 years.

10. Steve Backshall

Best known for his television series “Deadly 60,” Backshall has been a part of numerous expedition teams and published several novels and children’s books.

Authors

 

11. Bradford Angier

This survivalist has published over 35 books focusing on how to live with minimal resources. Many created a lifestyle from his book “One Acre & Security,” which proposed living organically on 1-acre of land.

12. Jamie Maslin

This author was an instructor for the British Bushcraft School and is most well-known for the innovative method of fire creation by friction.

13. John “Lofty” Wiseman

He is best known for his 14 publications focusing on Special Air Service Survival techniques. When he was 18, he became the youngest man to pass selection for the SAS and during his time serving, he became a legend.

14. James Mandeville

Most known for his survival publications in magazines and newspapers, Mandeville is often asked for advice on expeditions. He spent 23 years teaching survival training to soldiers in the jungles of South America and Asia.

Leaders

 

15. Ruediger Nehberg

This survival expert not only introduced survival training in Europe, but also plays a huge role in protecting human rights. He is famous for crossing the Atlantic Ocean in a pedal boat in 1987.

16. Tom Brown

Brown spent ten years living in the American wilderness using exclusively primitive tools. With his knowledge, he went on to publish 18 books and found the Tracker School in New Jersey.

17. Larry Olsen

He is known for founding the Anasazi Foundation the first accredited outdoor behavioral healthcare provider.

18. Lisa Fenton

She is co-founder of Woodsmoke, a survival school in the United Kingdom. She has led several expedition trips and often spends weeks or months living in the wilderness.

Famous Survival Experts

 

19. Richard Proenneke

Well known for his documentary, “Alone in the Wilderness,” he takes the viewer through his thirty year stay in the woods.

20. Richard Graves

He founded and led the Australian Jungle Rescue Detachment which was responsible for 300 rescues. His survival skills allowed for every mission to be successful. He later went on to run a bushcraft school and publish ten books.

21. Ricky McGee

After being left for dead in the Australian outback, he survived for 70 days on insects until he was found by farm hands.

Historical Bushcraft Pioneers

 

22. Alexander Selkirk

He stayed behind on the Juan Fernandez archipelago expecting to be picked up by a passing British ship in 1704 but spent nearly four and a half years surviving in solitude.

23. John Muir

He is responsible for petitioning Congress to create National Parks. He once walked from Indiana all the way to Florida simply to sight-see.

24. Enos Mills

He became one of the first paid survivalists, becoming the Colorado State Snow Observer where he had the job of observing and predicting snowfall.

25. John Colter

He was the first European to enter Yellowstone and was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

26. Davy Crockett

As both “King of the Wild Frontier” and politician, he became one of the best-known American bushcraft pioneers.

27. Fernao Lopes

This soldier spent 30 long years in isolation on the then uninhabited island of St. Helena becoming a legend in Portugal.

28. Ernest Shackleton

After attempting to cross Antarctica on foot, his crew spent two years forced to survive in the harsh environment.

29. Jedediah Smith

He was the first European to cross Nevada, explore Utah, and to enter California by land.

30. William Williams

He led several expeditions in the West during his time and served as an interpreter for the government.

From the modern-day founders of an interest in bushcraft skills, to historical survivalists, these influential role models have provided the knowledge necessary for everyone to have the skills they need to survive in the wild.

 

Click here to watch Video

10 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Everyday Carry Pack

We like to make sure our families and homes are prepared for the unexpected. We have shelves stocked with disaster-preparedness items: bottled water, canned goods, flashlights and batteries.

Our family members know a safe meeting spot—the basement or a hallway, maybe— to gather in case of emergency. Being ready feels great. The only problem is, we aren’t always home.

While it might not be practical to spend every possible moment in the safety of our houses, we do have a practical alternative.

Bring Survival Gear with You

One of the best ways we can stay prepared for the unexpected is by keeping a smart stash of survival gear in an everyday carry pack. That way, we will be ready for almost anything no matter where we are.

Many options of bags are available, from army-style backpacks to sleek messenger-style bags. Once you have your pack, optimize its usefulness with the following suggestions.

1. Staying Hydrated Means Staying Alive

Without hydration, our bodies shut down quickly. Always keep a reusable water bottle with fresh water in your daypack. A stainless steel canteen or thermos is your best bet, as metal is durable and holds up well despite extreme temperatures. It could also help you with cooking needs.

Pack water purification tablets so you can create more drinkable water when necessary. Consider iodine tablets or chlorine dioxide tablets. Beyond water, all living things also need a small amount of salt to stay hydrated.

Quench your body’s thirst completely by filling a re-sealable, waterproof plastic bag with electrolyte powder. This can be dissolved in drinkable water, and when your supply has been exhausted you can find a new use for the bag.

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2. Fueling Up with Food Supplies

Hydration, sleep, and sustenance are our top three biological needs. Be prepared with several nutrient-rich, high-calorie meal bars. Also pack some lightweight dehydrated meals, which are optimally consumed with the addition of a small amount of water.

Be ready to find and prepare more food, if necessary. Always carry a small, metal cooking pan with a folding arm. Food can be cooked in it and eaten out of it.

Also invest in a set of metal utensils—again, they can be used for both cooking and eating. Keep a small book with an abbreviated list of edible plants found in local woods.

3. Preventing Infection with a First Aid Kit

Small wounds can turn into serious infections, if not treated properly. Pack a re-sealable, waterproof plastic bag with medical supplies.

This should include cloth squares of several sizes. Large pieces can be used as slings or tourniquets, in the case of injury. Small pieces can be used on wounds in place of gauze, and later sterilized in boiling water for re-use.

Pack several individually wrapped alcohol-soaked toilettes that can be used to disinfect cuts. Also pack band-aids, athletic tape, cotton swabs, and cotton balls. A small tub of petroleum jelly is very helpful for treating chapped or damaged skin.

4. Maintaining Your Sense of Surroundings

Not knowing where you are can be disorienting. Keep maps of local and surrounding areas in your daypack. Pack maps in a re-sealable, waterproof plastic bag.

Also keep a sturdy compass, and make sure you know how to use it properly.

5. Building and Repair with Durable Multi-Use Items

It can be difficult to know exactly what types of situations you might find yourself in. But a few survival supplies have proven themselves to be so useful that it makes sense to keep them on-hand. Rope can be used for securing branches together when building shelter, or hanging damp clothes up to dry.

Duct tape can be used to patch up damaged supplies, or cut and folded to create new items. A multi-purpose knife can help harvest wild edible plants, carve wood, and tear fabric if necessary. Pack all items in re-sealable plastic bags.

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6. Warming Up and Using Light without Electricity

Exposure to the elements can be dangerous to your health. Stay warm and dry by allowing yourself to build a fire anytime, using waterproof strike-anywhere matches.

Keep a super-lightweight emergency thermal blanket in your daypack to help stay warm. Also keep a solar-powered headlamp in your supply kit.

Headlamps are extremely convenient, as they allow you to see and freely use both hands in the dark. A headlamp equipped with solar panels will stay lit for seven hours.

7. Recording Information and Communicating Off the Grid

You will often benefit from recording or swapping information with others. Make this possible by stocking your daypack with a leather-bound journal and waterproof pen.

Pack a whistle in case you ever need to sound a distress signal, and memorize SOS. A mirror can also be used to make signals, help you maintain personal hygiene, treat wounds, and stay sane if isolated.

 

8. Taking Care of Yourself

Poor personal hygiene can lead to poor health. Illness is the last thing you need in a survival situation.

Be prepared with a toothbrush, toothpaste, dental floss, and multi-purpose biodegradable soap. Use the soap for your face and body, hair, clothing, and cookware.

9. Clothing for All Situations

Keep a tiny, travel-sized sewing kit in your daypack. Make sure you have a basic understanding of how to use a needle and thread to repair clothing.

Pack a lightweight waterproof outer layer. Staying dry in inclement weather will help you maintain a healthy body temperature.

Also pack an insulating thermal layer, hat, and gloves, which may be needed to stave off cold weather. Pack extra wool socks to keep feet dry.

Wool is an excellent survival material as it is durable, dries quickly, and repels moisture.

10. Remembering the Other Important Things

Psychological research has shown how important it is for us to feel a sense of love and belonging.

Feeling connected with others not only tethers us to reality—it often gives us reason to live. Help yourself through the most unexpected and unwanted of times by keeping a personal memento or two in your daypack.

Someday, a special photograph or trinket might be just what you need to keep on pushing forward.

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14 Facts About Prepping Everyone Thinks are True

14 Facts About Prepping Everyone Thinks are True

Modern day preppers are often seen as crazy, doomsday-seekers who are planning for the zombie apocalypse. It may be surprising to learn that the majority of preppers are normal everyday people who are simply ensuring the safety of themselves and their families in the event of emergency.

Myths and Misconceptions about Prepping

Several common misconceptions steer people away from stocking up on supplies and knowledge to help increase survival odds in the event of disaster. Debunking these myths will leave you more open-minded to and understanding of the prepping lifestyle.

1. Prepping is too expensive.

One of the biggest misconceptions about being prepared is that it takes a lot of money to build up a stock of supplies. The thought of spending so much money on an event that may or may not occur holds many people back from creating their emergency kit.

This myth, however, stems from not having enough knowledge about prepping and the opposite is true. By buying products in bulk, groceries can actually become less expensive over time.

2. I only need a small emergency kit.

The most dangerous myth about prepping is that survival is possible with a basic 72-hour kit. The reality, however, is that reaching more supplies or help can become a struggle in an emergency.

Having a meager three day supply will not be sufficient unless the emergency can be quickly resolved. Even natural disasters can leave victims suffering for weeks.

3. Preparedness would be taught in school if it was important.

Although modern education has provided immeasurable benefits, it is not all encompassing. Many basic skills necessary for life are not taught in school such as how to prepare proper meals, how to care for our young, and how to care for ourselves. Relying on school alone to prepare us for life would leave the majority struggling with basic life tasks.

4. I can get the information I need from the internet.

With the widespread use of the internet, people have become accustomed to searching for a question and receiving an answer instantaneously.

The internet does provide a wealth of information concerning preparedness but the accuracy of the information is not guaranteed. More importantly, in the event of a disaster the internet will likely not be an available resource.

5. The government will help.

When looking at historical situations where prepping would be beneficial, we see a common theme of relying on the government, FEMA, or other emergency agencies to bail out the majority.

A glaring example of government inefficiency is shown by the unfolding of events after Hurricane Katrina. Not only did the Mayor neglect to order a city-wide evacuation, but volunteers and help were delayed for days due to government red tape.

The government actually caused more of a problem than a solution, delaying volunteers, the restoration of power, and the arrival of much needed supplies (http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1012/81957.html).

6. Prepping takes up too much space.

Many people are pushed away from the idea of prepping because they believe they lack the necessary storage for supplies.

You don’t need a huge bunker or garage to store your items, a small area you likely already have is more than sufficient. Much of your stock should be condensed into movable units anyway in case of the need for evacuation.

7. Prepping takes too much time.

Envisioning preparing for a doomsday situation or even a serious natural disaster can be overwhelming. At first glance, it would seemingly take serious dedication and skill to acquire the necessary knowledge and supplies.

To put it in perspective, a few hours a month is really all that is required to ensure your safety in the event of an emergency.

8. I can live off of what nature provides.

The notion that mankind had survived for thousands of years before supermarkets by living off of nature leads many to believe that surviving outdoors is manageable.

It must be taken into account that past man’s ‘nature’ is widely different from today’s world. Unless a national park is nearby, the reality is that food in the form of wild animals and fresh, clean drinking water are probably miles away from your neighborhood. Additionally, living off the land was not as easy as history may lead one to believe.

The first American colony, Jamestown, was founded with 104 colonists. After the first winter, only 38 settlers remained (http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/amerbegin/settlement/text1/text1read.htm).

9. I can survive with my current knowledge.

Click hereModern society puts an emphasis on more advanced and complicated knowledge rather than basic survival skills. In the event of disaster, however, the later becomes significantly more valuable than the ability to solve algebraic equations.

Survival skills as basic as finding food, water, and shelter are not something that can simply be read and repeated. Execution of these skills is vital.

10. Preppers must be outdoorsmen.

After realizing the skills that are necessary to survive outdoors, many tend to assume that preppers must be expert survivalists.

On the contrary, most prepping is done by building up food and water supplies.

11. Prepping is for the apocalypse.

Preppers are often associated with the idea of doomsday.

Prepping, however, is not only for the zombie apocalypse or nuclear fallout situations. Preparing can mean the difference between life and death in something as common as a tornado or hurricane.

12. Being a prepper makes me anti-government.

Ensuring your safety by being prepared in no way implies an anti-government stance.

Most preppers are ordinary people with ordinary political views, who simply acknowledge that the government may not always be available to support and supply them.

13. Prepping is just a trend right now.

Prepping is far from just a passing trend. Preparing for disasters, long winters, and times without supplies was historically commonplace.

In fact, it was necessary in order to survive. Our ancestors did not have the convenience of supermarkets, cars, or the internet to instantaneously provide for them. It would be more accurate to say that our modern lifestyle is a trend.

14. Prepping is an individualistic conquest.

Though the main goal of being prepared is to ensure your personal safety, it is important to point out that the majority of people will not be prepared when disaster hits. Taking this into account, your preparation can help save many more lives than just your own.

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