7 Reasons Why Society May Collapse Because of Your Survival Gear

7 Reasons Why Society May Collapse Because of Your Survival Gear

Imagine that there has been a worldwide pandemic, a flu-like virus that kills people within 48-hours.  The United States is in disarray, the government is barely functioning and the military is busy trying to enforce quarantine zones between cities.

No one is sure what has caused the pandemic.  It may be something in the food or the water supply.  The world has become a very dangerous place with looting, gangs and criminals on the loose. 

Stores have been emptied and everyone is fending for themselves.  Smart preppers and survivalists have already bunkered down or bugged out.   

You have been tasked with getting a potential cure from Knoxville, Tennessee to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta — a distance of approximately 191 miles.  This is a crucial task because it may be the only way to save civilization as we know it.

Because no one is sure what has caused the pandemic, you will be forced to stay in areas that are less-populated.  Most of the highways are blocked by panicked people trying to escape the cities and there are reports of militias setting up roadblocks.  You will travel through rural areas and forests on foot. 

You grab your survival kit and head out the door.  There is a lot depending on you!  Here are 7 reasons why society may collapse because of the contents of your survival kit.

7) You Didn’t Take Enough Water Purification Options
When you left Washington, you only had 1 gallon of water and a water filter.  By two days into the journey, you have run out of water so head to a nearby river to refill your canteen. 

You use the water filter to fill up.  You drink the water and within 5 hours you begin to feel ill.  Within 48 hours, you are dead.  The cure never makes it to the CDC and civilization collapses!

The pandemic was caused by a water-borne virus and you became infected when you drank the water.  Most water filters are only effective at removing sediment, some chemicals and some bacteria from water.

To kill viruses you needed to use one of the following options:

  • Boiling the water for more than 1 minute (very high effectiveness at killing viruses)
  • Disinfecting with iodine or chlorine (high effectiveness)
  • Disinfecting with chlorine dioxide (high effectiveness)

6) You Didn’t Self-Defense Seriously
Two days into the journey you hear a woman yelling for help.  You rush to her aid and find that she looks to have fallen and injured her ankle.  The next thing you hear is the familiar sound of a pump action shotgun being cocked — it was an ambush.

You had been spotted by some hardcore survivalists who have decided to steal your supplies.  You didn’t have a rifle or pistol, so you couldn’t defend yourself.  If had taken a rifle, these survivalists would have seen it and been less likely to ambush you.

They take everything you have and despite your pleading, they destroy the vaccine — civilization collapses. 

5) You Got Lost!

As you rushed out the door with your survival kit, you only had time to grab the GPS from your car.  Time was crucial and you had to start the journey immediately so the vaccine could be quickly manufactured and distributed. 

One day into the journey, your GPS malfunctioned.  You didn’t  bring a paper map and compass, so moving around the forest quickly becomes confusing.  You also tripped and became disorientated.  Ten days later and you are still wandering around the forest, alone, hungry and thirsty. Time has run out and the CDC has given up on finding a cure — society collapses.

Always bring redundancies for crucial items like navigational tools.  A paper map and compass should always be included in your survival kit.  Smart survivalists will also learn how to navigate without a compass by using telltale signs in the natural environment.

4) You Couldn’t Start a Fire
By the end of day two you are making good progress, despite the heavy rain.  You are confident that you will make it to the CDC headquarters in time.  As the light levels fall, you slip on a root and fall down an embankment into a freezing stream.

You get out of the water quickly and start to build a fire.  You understand the risks of hypothermia and how deadly it can be.  You unpack your kit and realize that your matches are wet and you can’t find your lighter. It must be at the bottom of the stream! 

The matches fail to get the kindling started and you are left shivering in the dark as the rain gets heavier.   Hypothermia sets in and the cold rainy days take their toll.  Your pace slows and you fail to make it to the CDC in time!

You should have bought more options fire starting a fire and for staying warm.  Your survival kit should have included:

  • A high-quality magnesium fire starter
  • Some dry kindling in a plastic bag or wooden dowels which could be shaved for kindling
  • Petroleum smeared cotton balls
  • High-quality mylar space blanket

3) You Didn’t Pack Extra Socks!
After two days trekking in rainy conditions and being forced to walk through a number of streams — your socks are constantly wet.  Not only is it making you much colder, you begin to develop trench foot. 

The initial symptoms of trench foot can include an itchy sensation on the feet, numbness, heavy feeling in the feet, a prickly sensation, cold skin and blotchy skin.  After drying the feet, they can become very painful and blisters may form.  Severe trench foot can kill tissue on the feet and result in the loss of toes.  Trench foot occurs in as little as 13 hours.

With incredibly sore and painful feet you can’t make it to the CDC in time —  everyone dies!

Pack extra socks in your survival kit and try to ensure your feet stay dry.

2) Your First Aid Kit Was Lacking
On the first day of your journey to the CDC, you had an accident and fell off a ridge.  It resulted in a serious cut on your arm and a sprained wrist.  You pulled out your first aid kit only to discover it did not have any antibiotic ointment and no way to seal a serious cut.

You bandage it as well as you can and move on.  Within 48 hours, the cut has become infected and you are weakened by blood loss.  The pain is preventing you from thinking clearly and you are starting to feel a fever coming on.  Your condition worsens and you get blood poisoning, dying alone in the forest.  Civilization collapses!

You should have taken a more comprehensive first aid kit with:

  • Antibiotic cream, disinfectant pads, wet wipes and burn cream
  • Aspirin tablets, Ibuprofen tablets, Diphenhydramine (Allergy) Tablets and Loperamide (Anti-diarrhea) Tablets
  • Adhesive tape, butterfly wound closures, triangular bandage (sling) and band aids
  • Bandages including gauze pads and sterile combine dressing
  • Eye drops
  • Scissors, tweezers, scalpel, SAM splints

1) You Didn’t Pack the Right Food
After the first day of hiking, you realize you only have sugary and salty foods in your back pack.  Most of the items were “survival-branded” protein bars that were loaded with sugar.  Foods that are high in sugar and salt can greatly increase your thirst.  Additionally, most sugary foods do not provide adequate nutrition for long stretches of physical activity.

After two days you are sick of the high levels of sugar you are consuming and your energy is waning.  After three days, your pace has significantly slowed and your body is not reacting well to these sugary foods.  After four days of existing on sugary protein bars, you are vomiting and sick.  You don’t make it to the CDC in time!

Only pack nutritious food in your survival.  For a short stretch of hiking, include:

  • Meals, Ready to Eat (MREs)
  • Canned meat and beef jerky
  • Canned legumes
  • Dehydrated foods
  • Crackers
  • Dried fruits
  • Peanut butter
  • Unsalted nuts

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  1. Robert

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